Animals · Meat · Turkeys

Happy Thanksgiving from Frontière Farm House

As we approach Thanksgiving, we are being bombarded with ads for Black Friday. Which started… before Halloween? It seems so wrong that the day after we are expressing our thankfulness, we are expected to go buck-wild in a retail store and spend all our hard-earned money to show our loved ones how much we care. This is something I’ve seen repeated time and time again, so I will stop there.

But, at Frontière Farm House, we are very thankful for all of you. We are grateful for the support you’ve given us during this growing season. We have had more people ask us for our pastured turkey than we were able to provide. We have a few turkeys that have not been claimed, and we will be bringing them to the market this Saturday. They will be available first come, first served. This is the only way we can offer them fairly, and not risk going home with a truck full of turkeys because people haven’t shown up.

We have one request from all of you fine folks. Don’t forget about us. And we don’t just mean us as in Robert and Nicole. We mean “us” as in all the small farmers in your area. Follow them on Facebook, and Like or comment on a photo now and then. Like their photos on Instagram. Give them a retweet if something you enjoy comes up. And a big one that we love to see is when people tag us in the photos of their meals. For many of us, we are entering the slow season, even with freezers and coolers full of meat and produce. People get busy with holiday parties and preparing for family get-togethers. Going to the weekly farmers market becomes a task that is pushed to the back of your mind. But we are still out here, feeding our animals, growing veggies in hoop houses, and caring for our soil. We still need you.

Pick up another turkey for Christmas. Or get a duck, or a chicken and put it on your smoker. Get a ham from your local pork purveyor instead of one of those spiral sliced ones full of MSG and other weird preservatives. Get a bag of onions from the farmers market, because they will keep for a while. Get your honey and jam made by someone you’ve met, instead of off the shelf in the grocery store. There are so many ways to support your local farmers. And I promise that they ALL still need you.

Our friend Greg Gunthorp, of Gunthorp Farms, made a Facebook post today suggesting that folks make a 2020 New Years Resolution to purchase from their local farmers more often than they did in 2019. Or to sign up for a CSA. Or to become a regular at their local farmers market. Or to purchase a freezer bundle of tasty, high quality meats. And we would absolutely love if you did this. We are changing up the way we are doing things this year, and we don’t want to make any promises we can’t keep. But the one thing we can and will promise is that we will continue to provide the best quality meat and eggs for our customers that we are able to raise, for as long as we can. With your help and support, this will be for a long time to come.

Happy Thanksgiving from Frontière Farm House. We are thankful for you.

Animals · Meat · Production · Turkeys

Let’s Talk Turkey

As I sit and write this, Thanksgiving is the furthest thing from my mind. However, we run a farm, and we are constantly thinking about the next seasons, and following years.

A couple weeks ago, an acquaintance of ours found some turkey poults for a great price. He contacted me and let me know. I contacted a few friends to see if they would want to get some with me. A couple friends were available, but the first person to jump at the opportunity was Janice. She is part of the fantastic family of folks who came to install our high tensile fencing, Sitting Bull Fencing and Agriculture Solutions. She finished up her chores, and we, along with her twin daughters, headed to Family Farm And Home.

The girls found some pretty Plymouth Blues, and we decided to get the rest of them. We split them between us, and we are all quite happy with that. They also picked up a few Cornish X, which were discounted pretty heavily.

Finally, we got to the turkeys. Initially on the phone, the employee told me they had about 40. Once we got there, there were only 30 in the bin, but he was willing to honor the discounted price for as many as we wanted. We came to the conclusion that it would be irresponsible to not take all of them. So into the boxes they went! All 100+ of them.

Janice was VERY happy about what we picked up!

We did split the turkey purchase, and they took home about 30 turkeys, in addition to their Plymouth Blues, and Cornish X. They will have some full freezers and lots of eggs soon!

Unfortunately, we did lose a few of the poults early on. We couldn’t get the temperature of the brooder to stay consistent, and we think that stressed them out. Once we got that worked out, they’ve been doing really well.

Twelve juvenile broad breasted bronze turkeys crowd around a feeder at Frontiere Farm House
The bald “elbows” are normal on Broad Breasted varieties of turkeys. A week and a half after taking this photo, they are fully covered.

As with all of our animals, they are eating a feed ration that is from a local grain mill. They use locally grown grains, so this helps strengthen our local economy, and reduce the carbon footprint of our animals. This is something that is very important to us. In addition to being fed the feed ration, they will be on pasture, with access to grass, bugs, seeds, and fresh air. They will be free to be turkeys and do what turkeys are supposed to do!

So now, onto the exciting part for all of you! Turkeys for the holidays! We will start getting these processed in late August or early September. We plan on staggering the butchering dates so they are a variety of sizes. They will be priced at $3/pound, and sold as whole birds with the giblets included. It will look a lot like what you get in the grocery store, but not pumped full of preservatives, water, salt, sugar, modified food starch, or “Sodium Phosphate to enhance tenderness and juiciness”.

This was our personal holiday turkey last year

If you are interested in ordering one of the turkeys, please send us a message and let us know about how large of a bird you would like to purchase. Since this is our first year, we are anticipating a wide range in our weights, and we will do our best to accommodate all size requests. Please understand that raising poultry in small batches is not fool-proof, and we cannot make any promises on sizes.

As we get nearer to the holidays, we will share some suggestions on how to enjoy pastured turkey.