2020 Uberlist · Chickens · CSA · Meat · Production

The First Chickens for 2020

This whole year has gone a little wild for us, like many others. We called our processor a couple days ago to book processing for our first batch of chickens, and we are excited to announce they will be available on July 4th, 2020! This was definitely an intentional decision on our part, and we hope you will consider purchasing some fresh, never frozen chicken for your socially distant 4th of July celebrations.

These birds are from a previous batch

We will have them available whole, halved, or 8 piece. We will not be separating them into parts. Whole chickens are $4.50/lb, halved and 8 piece are $5.00/lb. Whole birds are great as a “beer can chicken”. Halves are awesome for the smoker or the grill. And the 8 piece is perfect for frying, grilling, oven roasting, or just about anything!

In addition to the birds, we will have feet, necks, hearts, gizzards, and livers back in stock!

We can’t wait to start feeding you again.

Animals · Meat · Production · Turkeys

Let’s Talk Turkey 2020

Despite 2020 already being… well… all of this… we assume time will continue to tick on, and Thanksgiving will eventually get here. We’ve placed our order for turkey poults, which means it’s time to start taking deposits! We will be modifying how we do turkey dispersal this year, to make things a little easier on us, and make sure everyone can get what they request.

First, there will be a non-refundable deposit of $25. This helps us afford the cost of acquiring the poults, and paying for part of the feed. Turkeys eat a lot and take a lot of work to grow them out. If you do not show up to pick up your turkey on the date you decide upon (we will send out an email later on and you will choose your pickup date and location), you will forfeit your deposit.

This deposit will obviously go towards the total cost of your turkey. The turkeys will be whole birds, with the neck and giblets included, and will be priced at $4.00/lb. We will also offer the option to purchase a half turkey, which will not include the giblets, and will be priced at $4.50/lb. If you would like to purchase a half turkey, let us know when ordering.

Turkeys will be sold frozen. We choose to sell our birds this way to allow more flexibility for the processor, and to be able to process birds over the course of a few weeks, which means we can have a wider range of sizes available. Contrary to the belief of many, turkey that is frozen properly is practically indistinguishable from fresh, never frozen turkey. We rent a commercial freezer that is set to -4 Fahrenheit (or lower!), which allows the meat to freeze quickly, keeping the texture and flavor intact. To thaw a turkey, allow approximately 24 hours for every 5 pounds of bird. Stick it in the fridge a few days ahead of time, and you’ll be ready to go by the morning of the holiday.

If all of this sounds good to you, you can head over to our fancy new online store and place your deposit. If you have any additional questions about our turkeys, feel free to contact us! We appreciate your support and trust with such an important part of your holiday dinners. We look forward to feeding all of you!

Animals · Meat · Sheep

The Lambs Have Arrived!

After two weeks to the day, all of our Jacob ewes have lambed. Our solo Romeldale girl Calypso isn’t due for a couple weeks still, but we are calling lambing season done, for all intents and purposes.

First up, on April 12, Janus gave birth unassisted to a two horn ewe named Vienna, sired by Limerick.

Janus the four horn Jacob ewe with lamb Vienna

April 17th brought a pair of four horned, blue eyed twin rams, Kolsch the lilac, and Porter is black, to Tanka, sired by Apollo. They were a little slow to figure things out, but got themselves together within half a day.

April 21, we called our farm vet to assist Citra with the delivery of her ram lamb Pilsner. He was all sorts of backwards, and on the small side with rather long legs. His sire is Limerick.

On Earth Day, April 22, Galena gave birth to twins. Schwarzbier the ram, and Corona the ewe. They are sired by Limerick.

On April 23, the second of our two original ewes, Haiku, had twin ewes. They were quite tiny, and still are the smallest lambs we have, got tangled up, and because of that, we needed to call the vet out again. In no time flat, she had the two tiny girls out, named India and Amber. They are sired by Apollo.

Sunday April 26, had two ewes giving birth. Up first was Hallertauer who had two lilac boys, Lager and Labatt, while we had some farm visitors. Cascade went into labor a few hours later, and had twins. The larger of the two didn’t make it, but the smaller is vigorous and growing well. This little guy has not been named yet. Both of those gals had their lambs sired by Apollo.

We are so excited to watch all these babies grow up! We will be keeping the majority of the ewes to add to our breeding stock, but may consider selling some later on. Some of the rams are destined for the dinner table, and others will be sold to Jacob breeders to continue the preservation of this awesome breed.

This post was sponsored by our Patreon supporter Melina. Find her gorgeous hand dyed yarn on FacebookInstagram, and Etsy, and find her knitting patterns on her website and Ravelry.

Chickens · Ducks · Geese · Pigs · Production · Sheep · Turkeys

Exciting News for 2020: Pork, Lamb, and More Poultry

This post has been rolling around my brain for some time. But there have been many other things rolling around up there, and it’s been hard to string together coherent sentences. Finally, I have found myself at a point in Coronatine where I feel like I can adequately describe what we have planned for this year! And it’s a lot!

Chicks from 2019

Up first, we will be raising MORE pastured chicken! We have 100 chicks arriving this week, and an additional 100 arriving in May. We are modifying how we will be raising them ever so slightly, so they will have more space to roam and find tasty snacks. This will result in more flavorful meat, and happier, healthier birds. We will do at least one more batch of 100 birds before the end of the season, possibly two.

We will also be raising more duck! We have a muscovy hen setting a nest in the barn, and we are pretty sure there is one under one of the coops (the same one who set a nest under there back at the end of summer 2019). We will raise these ducklings in the barn to start, and then move them outside with the rest of the flock once feathered. This gives them the best start on our farm. Because of our mixed flock, little babies can’t really keep up with mom amongst all the turkeys and geese and other bigger birds. The girls will join the ranks of the layers, and the boys will be destined for the freezer. We will also be getting some pekins to raise for meat.

In July, we will welcome 100 turkey poults. These will be a broad breasted breed, which is the same as what we raised last year. We are also hoping to have a handful of heritage turkeys to put on the table. Our friend Alyssa, from Tall Grass Farm, is incubating some turkey eggs for us, and so far they are developing well. We will have a post soon about how to order turkey for this year. It will be similar to last year, but with a few modifications based on things we’ve learned from our driveway mini market. They will be processed a little bit before Thanksgiving, and frozen so they can be served for other holidays as well.

It’s lambing season, and as of when I’m sitting down to write this, two of eight ewes have lambed. Janus gave us a sweet, beautiful ewe lamb. Tanka gave us a pair of robust 4 horn rams, one a gorgeous dark lilac, and one a lively black. And both those boys have the prettiest blue eyes. We will hopefully have lamb available before the winter holidays. It will depend on if the lambs grow fast enough to make it profitable to send them to the butcher at that point in time. We are planning on giving them minimal grain, and allowing them to grow on the rich pasture that grows here.

Here is the Tall Farmer with the beautiful ewe lamb

Finally, the thing SO MANY people have been asking about: PORK! We will be working with our friends at Ham Sweet Farm and starting with some American Guinea Hogs. For at least this first year, we will be raising them as feeders, and not breeding them. These are a delicious lard breed that is known for rich red meat, and melt in your mouth lard. Depending on their growth, we are hoping to process some before the winter holidays, and perhaps grow a couple of them out longer to allow for the most flavor to develop. We will be working with a couple local produce farms, getting their scraps regularly to enrich the diet of the pigs, as well as the rest of our animals.

In addition to all of this, we are going to hopefully have our yarn back from the mill in the next couple months. And we have the wool from this year’s shearing in the barn, waiting to be processed. Plus, we have our usual eggs and meat happening. If you want to buy into all this goodness, we have our Farm Share CSA available here.

If you would like to follow what we are up to, our Facebook page and Instagram are the best spots.

2020 Uberlist · Animals · CSA · Eggs · flowers · Goals · Market · Meat · Production · Vegetables

The Frontière Farm House CSA 2020

In 2019, we had some amazing supporters for our CSA card, so we decided to bring it back again this year!

What is a CSA?
CSA stands for “Community Supported Agriculture.” Farming is an expensive endeavor that requires a lot of upfront investment, and the returns take a while to show. Having a CSA means that farmers can get an influx of capital up-front, and customers usually get a discount for making that investment early on.

What makes our CSA different?
We are asking for a purchase of a CSA membership upfront in a set amount of $100, $250 or $500. This will get you what is essentially a Frontière Farm House gift card loaded with that amount that you can use at any of our markets. There is no expiration date on the card, and it can be topped up whenever is convenient for you, in those same amounts. You can spend as much or as little as you want, when you want. You do not need to pick up weekly, and you get to choose exactly what you receive.

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What do you get with the membership?
With this purchase, we are offering a bonus on loading and reloading the card. If you make the initial purchase before April 30, 2020, the bonus will be as follows:
$100 purchase gets you: $115 (an extra 15%)
$250 purchase gets you: $292.50 (an extra 17%)
$500 purchase gets you: $600 (an extra 20%)
After April 30, 2020, including any reloads, the bonus will be as follows:
$100 purchase gets you: $110 (an extra 10%)
$250 purchase gets you: $280 (an extra 12%)
$500 purchase gets you: $575 (an extra 15%)
This bonus amount will remain the same for all of 2020. We may change the bonus percentage in the future.

What can you get with the CSA?
In short, anything we sell! This year, we plan on offering: Chicken, duck, turkey, and goose eggs; and chicken, duck, goose, and turkey meat. We also hope to offer lamb this year, if all goes well with lambing season in the spring! In addition, we will have other sheep products at various times, such as raw fleeces, processed fiber, and yarn. We are dialing back our plant production, but we will have a small selection of seasonal vegetables, herbs, and cut flowers; our delicious spice blends and infused salts; and some of Nicole’s handmade items (at most markets). We will post a Facebook update with what will be available at the market weekly.

What can you not get with the CSA?
The only things that the CSA cannot be spent on are wholesale orders, deposits for pre-orders, whole or half lambs, and our Egg CSA. Basically, you cannot “double dip” the discounts.

If you are ready to jump on board, contact us here! We have also made e-gift cards available here! To get the bonus for your CSA level use the codes ONEHUNDRED, TWOFIFTY, or FIVEHUNDRED for the respective amounts you’d like to purchase! Using the code will discount your card to the amount owed.

Animals · Meat · Turkeys

Happy Thanksgiving from Frontière Farm House

As we approach Thanksgiving, we are being bombarded with ads for Black Friday. Which started… before Halloween? It seems so wrong that the day after we are expressing our thankfulness, we are expected to go buck-wild in a retail store and spend all our hard-earned money to show our loved ones how much we care. This is something I’ve seen repeated time and time again, so I will stop there.

But, at Frontière Farm House, we are very thankful for all of you. We are grateful for the support you’ve given us during this growing season. We have had more people ask us for our pastured turkey than we were able to provide. We have a few turkeys that have not been claimed, and we will be bringing them to the market this Saturday. They will be available first come, first served. This is the only way we can offer them fairly, and not risk going home with a truck full of turkeys because people haven’t shown up.

We have one request from all of you fine folks. Don’t forget about us. And we don’t just mean us as in Robert and Nicole. We mean “us” as in all the small farmers in your area. Follow them on Facebook, and Like or comment on a photo now and then. Like their photos on Instagram. Give them a retweet if something you enjoy comes up. And a big one that we love to see is when people tag us in the photos of their meals. For many of us, we are entering the slow season, even with freezers and coolers full of meat and produce. People get busy with holiday parties and preparing for family get-togethers. Going to the weekly farmers market becomes a task that is pushed to the back of your mind. But we are still out here, feeding our animals, growing veggies in hoop houses, and caring for our soil. We still need you.

Pick up another turkey for Christmas. Or get a duck, or a chicken and put it on your smoker. Get a ham from your local pork purveyor instead of one of those spiral sliced ones full of MSG and other weird preservatives. Get a bag of onions from the farmers market, because they will keep for a while. Get your honey and jam made by someone you’ve met, instead of off the shelf in the grocery store. There are so many ways to support your local farmers. And I promise that they ALL still need you.

Our friend Greg Gunthorp, of Gunthorp Farms, made a Facebook post today suggesting that folks make a 2020 New Years Resolution to purchase from their local farmers more often than they did in 2019. Or to sign up for a CSA. Or to become a regular at their local farmers market. Or to purchase a freezer bundle of tasty, high quality meats. And we would absolutely love if you did this. We are changing up the way we are doing things this year, and we don’t want to make any promises we can’t keep. But the one thing we can and will promise is that we will continue to provide the best quality meat and eggs for our customers that we are able to raise, for as long as we can. With your help and support, this will be for a long time to come.

Happy Thanksgiving from Frontière Farm House. We are thankful for you.

Chickens · Market · Meat · Production · Recipe · Tutorial

New Product Alert: Bone Broth Bundles!

November weather can be so gloomy, and is almost always so cold. We love keeping the house nice and warm by cooking foods that require long periods of time on the stove or in the oven. One of our favorites is making broth, and then turning that broth into soup.

We recently had a few dozen older laying hens and some extra roosters processed. These older birds have had a couple years to develop darker meat and extra flavor. They also have the prettiest, richest yellow fat I’ve ever seen on a bird.

Once the birds are this age, the meat gets tougher and stringier, and they are better suited to low and slow cooking, or pressure cooking. The meat can be shredded and used in many ways. The carcass is then amazing to turn into some delicious broth.

To help with your broth making endeavors we are now selling Bone Broth Bundles! These bundles are 10+ pounds of stewing hens, necks, feet, giblets, and whatever other parts and pieces we get back from our processor. We are selling them for a flat price of $35 per bundle. You will definitely be getting more than 10 lb of delicious pasture raised goodies, which will make FIVE GALLONS of bone broth, or chicken stock, or whatever you want to call it. If you use the bones twice, you will have even more!

This is what ten pounds of broth ingredients looks like. Your bundle may not be exactly the same. Some of them will have necks, some will have gizzards, others will have frames. They will all have at least one whole chicken, perfect for shredding into some tasty chicken noodle soup.

To make your broth, throw your stewing hens, necks, feet, giblets, and other parts into the biggest stock pot you own. You need it to hold about 10 cups of water per pound of bones and meat. Add a tablespoon or so of apple cider vinegar per pound of bones to help break down the bones and extract as much goodness as possible. Add veggies and herbs if you’d like. Carrots, onions, celery, garlic, mushrooms, parsley, chives, or whatever you have handy that works well in broth. Make sure it’s all completely covered in water. Bring it up to a boil for a few minutes, and then lower the heat and let it simmer for as long as you can stand. I like to start mine super early in the morning, and let it go until almost bed time.

Now comes time for straining. We find it easiest to start fishing out the bigger bones with tongs. Then scoop the broth and strain it through a mesh strainer. This gets the smallest bits of bones and veggies out. Some people like to put it through cheesecloth or something, but that takes out some of the tasty stuff. It does give you a clearer broth, so it’s really up to you. Depending on how long you simmered the broth for, you will have anywhere from a 4 cups to 8 cups of finished product. Taste it. If it has a strong enough flavor, throw it in the fridge. It will keep for about a week. If you want to have it longer, it can be easily frozen. If it doesn’t taste strong enough, you can simmer it longer to reduce it and concentrate those flavors

Making broth is SO easy, and SO much better for you that what you buy in cartons at the store. These Bone Broth Bundles will help you make around 5 gallons of broth, more if you cook the bones twice. The broth will be thick and delicious and full of nutrients. It’s perfect for using soup, like our Smoked Butternut Squash, Apple and Pork Soup, or making gravy, or just sipping out of a mug to keep yourself warm on these chilly days.

If you are interested in one of these bundles, contact us! We will have them available as often as possible. Please share photos of your broth making days with us!