2020 Uberlist · Animals · CSA · Eggs · flowers · Goals · Market · Meat · Production · Vegetables

The Frontière Farm House CSA 2020

In 2019, we had some amazing supporters for our CSA card, so we decided to bring it back again this year!

What is a CSA?
CSA stands for “Community Supported Agriculture.” Farming is an expensive endeavor that requires a lot of upfront investment, and the returns take a while to show. Having a CSA means that farmers can get an influx of capital up-front, and customers usually get a discount for making that investment early on.

What makes our CSA different?
We are asking for a purchase of a CSA membership upfront in a set amount of $100, $250 or $500. This will get you what is essentially a Frontière Farm House gift card loaded with that amount that you can use at any of our markets. There is no expiration date on the card, and it can be topped up whenever is convenient for you, in those same amounts. You can spend as much or as little as you want, when you want. You do not need to pick up weekly, and you get to choose exactly what you receive.

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What do you get with the membership?
With this purchase, we are offering a bonus on loading and reloading the card. If you make the initial purchase before April 30, 2020, the bonus will be as follows:
$100 purchase gets you: $115 (an extra 15%)
$250 purchase gets you: $292.50 (an extra 17%)
$500 purchase gets you: $600 (an extra 20%)
After April 30, 2020, including any reloads, the bonus will be as follows:
$100 purchase gets you: $110 (an extra 10%)
$250 purchase gets you: $280 (an extra 12%)
$500 purchase gets you: $575 (an extra 15%)
This bonus amount will remain the same for all of 2020. We may change the bonus percentage in the future.

What can you get with the CSA?
In short, anything we sell! This year, we plan on offering: Chicken, duck, turkey, and goose eggs; and chicken, duck, goose, and turkey meat. We also hope to offer lamb this year, if all goes well with lambing season in the spring! In addition, we will have other sheep products at various times, such as raw fleeces, processed fiber, and yarn. We are dialing back our plant production, but we will have a small selection of seasonal vegetables, herbs, and cut flowers; our delicious spice blends and infused salts; and some of Nicole’s handmade items (at most markets). We will post a Facebook update with what will be available at the market weekly.

What can you not get with the CSA?
The only things that the CSA cannot be spent on are wholesale orders, deposits for pre-orders, whole or half lambs, and our Egg CSA. Basically, you cannot “double dip” the discounts.

If you are ready to jump on board, contact us here!

2020 Uberlist · Animals · Goal 65 · Sheep

Ushering in a New Year with Ups and Downs

When we published our goals for 2020, I really wasn’t expecting to get started on them right on January 1. I was truly expecting to sort of lazily glide into the new year and start tackling goals by the first weekend. Unfortunately, that’s not the way life goes on the farm, and we lost one of our sheep overnight.

Verse was born on our farm on March 18, 2019 to Haiku. She was an adorable little lamb who was our only surviving lamb between the two ewes. For the last few months, she has been dealing with an unknown illness. We’ve had the farm vet out to take a look at her, Verse received some medication, and good food, and she continued to decline despite her extra TLC. Last night, she passed away due to an injury caused by the complications of the illness that she couldn’t recover from. I removed some of her wool to be used in a project in the future. It’s wonderfully soft.

We were both very upset, and sort of abandoned some of our plans for the day. However, as other farmers know, you can’t just give up when one thing goes wrong. We took care of some other chores, and then we headed north to another farm to bring a new ewe home. A Romeldale/California Variegated Mutant sheep fell into our laps recently, and we couldn’t say no to her. While picking her up from the farm about an hour away, she attempted to jump through a gate twice, and was generally quite rambunctious. That is until we got the halter on her and tried to lead her. Apparently, she forgot she has legs, and just turned into a bag of bricks. Robert carried her to the truck and loaded her in, where she happily rode the hour back home in a large dog crate surrounded by hay bales. When we got her home, we introduced her to the rest of the flock through a gate. The boys took an immediate interest in her, even though she should already be bred. We will see what happens in May when she is due! We named her Calypso, which follows our “hop variety” name theme for 2019. (We were supposed to pick her up in 2019, but scheduling just couldn’t work out)

As much as it hurts to lose Verse, she is no longer in pain. We need to continue to build the farm even when we suffer losses like this. We will continue to grow throughout this year, and we hope to share the ups and downs with all of you.

2020 Uberlist · Animals · Chickens · Ducks · Geese · Goals · Goats · Not Farming Related · Sheep · Turkeys

Our Goals for 2020

Finding inspiration from a bunch of other blogs, we decided to work on an “Uberlist” for Frontière Farm House. These are mostly my (Nicole) goals, with some that are for both of us to accomplish together. I am hoping that by sharing them with all of you, I will keep myself more accountable, and follow through on them. I may not update about the progress on each one, especially the more personal ones, but I will do my best to keep everyone updated on the ones that are farming related

My four categories are Self, Farm, Fiber, and Home. Those are four areas that I would like to see more personal growth this year. I will give more information on why we chose a goal, or what exactly it means, when we start updating. So, without further adieu, here is our 2020 Uberlist:

  1. SELF get a drivers license
  2. FARM blog 2x/mo for the farm
  3. FIBER share another free knitting pattern
  4. SELF/FIBER/HOME get her office functional
  5. HOME put up closet door curtains in her office
  6. HOME get his office functional
  7. FARM get all the rest of the business licensing squared away for selling other meats
  8. FARM get lamb in the freezer
  9. FARM get another meat consignor
  10. FIBER keep one Jacob fleece to play with
  11. FIBER start playing with a spinning wheel
  12. FIBER knit something for me with OUR YARN!!!
  13. FIBER knit something for Bob with OUR YARN!!!
  14. FIBER get other fleeces processed in a timely manner
  15. FIBER make dryer balls
  16. HOME get all the freezers organized
  17. HOME get rid of upright freezer and replace with chest freezer
  18. SELF go on at least one good walk with Luna weekly
  19. FARM get to ??? posts on Instagram
  20. FARM continue Tomorrow At The Market posts every week
  21. FIBER finish up as many unfinished knits as I possibly can
  22. FIBER frog any unfinished knitting projects that don’t spark joy/lost their needles/etc
  23. FIBER knit enough items to do shows in the fall/winter
  24. FIBER do at least two non-farmers market shows
  25. FIBER consign knitted stuff somewhere
  26. HOME get garage park-able
  27. HOME get saws back to Todd
  28. HOME organize spare barn stall
  29. HOME/FARM get shelving in barn organized
  30. SELF get eyes examine
  31. SELF get teeth cleaned
  32. SELF get tea cupboard under control
  33. SELF drink tea at least once a week
  34. SELF make cold brew coffee at least a handful of times in the warm months
  35. FARM sell gravity wagon
  36. FARM sell hoop house OR put it up
  37. FARM get birds in movable layer coops
  38. FARM re-seed south pasture
  39. FARM/HOME build raised beds for personal gardening
  40. FARM/HOME grow herbs on front porch in pots
  41. FARM build new shelters for fuzzy beasts
  42. HOME clean all the crap out of the attic
  43. HOME insulate the attic
  44. HOME fix moldy spot in ceiling from leaky roof
  45. HOME finish painting the spots we never finished
  46. HOME acquire baseboards and install them
  47. HOME get all the art framed/mounted
  48. HOME get all the art on the walls
  49. HOME investigate new trash collector options
  50. FARM get round pen cleaned up
  51. HOME get two stupid trees in front of house cut down
  52. HOME get junk pile at end of driveway cleaned up
  53. HOME use gravel to repair driveway
  54. HOME get new mailbox
  55. FARM raise 20+ meat ducks
  56. FARM raise 80+ meat turkeys
  57. FARM raise 200+ meat chickens
  58. FARM raise 5+ meat geese
  59. SELF earn $1000+ through Amazon Affiliate marketing
  60. FARM do another CustomInk campaign
  61. FARM order another batch of StickerMule stickers
  62. FARM figure out how to package and sell smoking wood bundles
  63. FIBER attend two or more fiber festivals
  64. FIBER vend/co-vend at one or more fiber festivals
  65. FARM add at least three videos to YouTube
  66. HOME get garbage disposal wired in
  67. HOME get outlet on kitchen island fixed
  68. HOME get kitchen wood shelf cleaned off and organized
  69. SELF go on a date once a month and pay attention to each other instead of our phones
  70. SELF see a therapist at least 4 times
  71. FARM run some sort of giveaway on Facebook
  72. HOME get thresholds installed throughout house
  73. HOME get that stupid piece of trim attached to the kitchen island thing
  74. HOME get dining table cleared off consistently
  75. HOME/SELF eat dinner at the dining table 2x monthly
  76. HOME/FIBER empty out current yarn storage
  77. HOME sell/donate all the current yarn storage I don’t need
  78. HOME make 1+ bread pudding a month while we are overwhelmed with eggs
  79. FARM find a business to work with regularly to collect food scraps for the chickens
  80. FARM/HOME organize all the egg cartons
  81. HOME get vent grate for dining room
  82. HOME get hutch into office if it fits/works with layout
  83. FIBER knit at least five items with scraps
  84. FARM get all the animal’s profiles up on the website
  85. SELF get a tattoo
  86. SELF go on a mini vacation (at least one night away from home)
  87. FARM plant garlic
  88. FARM/HOME harvest raspberries from patch/property perimeter
  89. HOME/SELF make something with those raspberries
  90. HOME can tomato sauce
  91. HOME can apple stuff
  92. HOME make five+ batches of sauerkraut
  93. FARM investigate camelid acquisition
  94. FARM have Doctor Walker out to the farm at least twice for general herd health
  95. FARM/SELF write at least one article to be published elsewhere
  96. HOME sell lawn sweeper
  97. HOME clean all the windowsills/windows
  98. FARM get gate wheels under gates that need it
  99. FARM put welded wire on gates that need it
  100. FARM figure out pasture rotation and stick with it
  101. SELF join Jodi in some creative endeavor
  102. SELF get personal email inbox under control
  103. FARM/FIBER register the farm with JSBA
  104. FARM register original three sheep
  105. FARM register this year’s offspring
  106. HOME clean out lazy Susan and re-organize it
  107. SELF attend ??? DCFC matches
  108. SELF intentionally hang out with a friend at least 10 times
  109. SELF bake bread at least once
  110. SELF ride a horse
  111. HOME fill all the holes in the baseboards and trim
  112. HOME fully organize master closet
  113. FIBER make 5+ things on the weaving looms
  114. HOME repair/replace downspouts as needed
  115. FARM get Facebook page to 2000 likes
  116. FARM get Instagram to 1700 follows
  117. SELF take Luna to a pool/lake at least once
  118. SELF read 10+ books
  119. FARM/SELF milk a sheep/goat/cow by hand
  120. FARM/SELF make soap/candles/something similar at least once

These goals may be removed, replaced, or modified at any time. If a goal will no longer assist in moving us forward, we will make adjustments as needed.

As you can see with goal number 2, we plan on blogging more in 2020. I already have a loose idea of what I want to share more of, and I am working on a posting calendar. We look forward to sharing this progress with all of you! And I would love to see your goals for 2020, please leave a link in the comments!

Animals · Meat · Turkeys

Happy Thanksgiving from Frontière Farm House

As we approach Thanksgiving, we are being bombarded with ads for Black Friday. Which started… before Halloween? It seems so wrong that the day after we are expressing our thankfulness, we are expected to go buck-wild in a retail store and spend all our hard-earned money to show our loved ones how much we care. This is something I’ve seen repeated time and time again, so I will stop there.

But, at Frontière Farm House, we are very thankful for all of you. We are grateful for the support you’ve given us during this growing season. We have had more people ask us for our pastured turkey than we were able to provide. We have a few turkeys that have not been claimed, and we will be bringing them to the market this Saturday. They will be available first come, first served. This is the only way we can offer them fairly, and not risk going home with a truck full of turkeys because people haven’t shown up.

We have one request from all of you fine folks. Don’t forget about us. And we don’t just mean us as in Robert and Nicole. We mean “us” as in all the small farmers in your area. Follow them on Facebook, and Like or comment on a photo now and then. Like their photos on Instagram. Give them a retweet if something you enjoy comes up. And a big one that we love to see is when people tag us in the photos of their meals. For many of us, we are entering the slow season, even with freezers and coolers full of meat and produce. People get busy with holiday parties and preparing for family get-togethers. Going to the weekly farmers market becomes a task that is pushed to the back of your mind. But we are still out here, feeding our animals, growing veggies in hoop houses, and caring for our soil. We still need you.

Pick up another turkey for Christmas. Or get a duck, or a chicken and put it on your smoker. Get a ham from your local pork purveyor instead of one of those spiral sliced ones full of MSG and other weird preservatives. Get a bag of onions from the farmers market, because they will keep for a while. Get your honey and jam made by someone you’ve met, instead of off the shelf in the grocery store. There are so many ways to support your local farmers. And I promise that they ALL still need you.

Our friend Greg Gunthorp, of Gunthorp Farms, made a Facebook post today suggesting that folks make a 2020 New Years Resolution to purchase from their local farmers more often than they did in 2019. Or to sign up for a CSA. Or to become a regular at their local farmers market. Or to purchase a freezer bundle of tasty, high quality meats. And we would absolutely love if you did this. We are changing up the way we are doing things this year, and we don’t want to make any promises we can’t keep. But the one thing we can and will promise is that we will continue to provide the best quality meat and eggs for our customers that we are able to raise, for as long as we can. With your help and support, this will be for a long time to come.

Happy Thanksgiving from Frontière Farm House. We are thankful for you.

Chickens · Market · Meat · Production · Recipe · Tutorial

New Product Alert: Bone Broth Bundles!

November weather can be so gloomy, and is almost always so cold. We love keeping the house nice and warm by cooking foods that require long periods of time on the stove or in the oven. One of our favorites is making broth, and then turning that broth into soup.

We recently had a few dozen older laying hens and some extra roosters processed. These older birds have had a couple years to develop darker meat and extra flavor. They also have the prettiest, richest yellow fat I’ve ever seen on a bird.

Once the birds are this age, the meat gets tougher and stringier, and they are better suited to low and slow cooking, or pressure cooking. The meat can be shredded and used in many ways. The carcass is then amazing to turn into some delicious broth.

To help with your broth making endeavors we are now selling Bone Broth Bundles! These bundles are 10+ pounds of stewing hens, necks, feet, giblets, and whatever other parts and pieces we get back from our processor. We are selling them for a flat price of $35 per bundle. You will definitely be getting more than 10 lb of delicious pasture raised goodies, which will make FIVE GALLONS of bone broth, or chicken stock, or whatever you want to call it. If you use the bones twice, you will have even more!

This is what ten pounds of broth ingredients looks like. Your bundle may not be exactly the same. Some of them will have necks, some will have gizzards, others will have frames. They will all have at least one whole chicken, perfect for shredding into some tasty chicken noodle soup.

To make your broth, throw your stewing hens, necks, feet, giblets, and other parts into the biggest stock pot you own. You need it to hold about 10 cups of water per pound of bones and meat. Add a tablespoon or so of apple cider vinegar per pound of bones to help break down the bones and extract as much goodness as possible. Add veggies and herbs if you’d like. Carrots, onions, celery, garlic, mushrooms, parsley, chives, or whatever you have handy that works well in broth. Make sure it’s all completely covered in water. Bring it up to a boil for a few minutes, and then lower the heat and let it simmer for as long as you can stand. I like to start mine super early in the morning, and let it go until almost bed time.

Now comes time for straining. We find it easiest to start fishing out the bigger bones with tongs. Then scoop the broth and strain it through a mesh strainer. This gets the smallest bits of bones and veggies out. Some people like to put it through cheesecloth or something, but that takes out some of the tasty stuff. It does give you a clearer broth, so it’s really up to you. Depending on how long you simmered the broth for, you will have anywhere from a 4 cups to 8 cups of finished product. Taste it. If it has a strong enough flavor, throw it in the fridge. It will keep for about a week. If you want to have it longer, it can be easily frozen. If it doesn’t taste strong enough, you can simmer it longer to reduce it and concentrate those flavors

Making broth is SO easy, and SO much better for you that what you buy in cartons at the store. These Bone Broth Bundles will help you make around 5 gallons of broth, more if you cook the bones twice. The broth will be thick and delicious and full of nutrients. It’s perfect for using soup, like our Smoked Butternut Squash, Apple and Pork Soup, or making gravy, or just sipping out of a mug to keep yourself warm on these chilly days.

If you are interested in one of these bundles, contact us! We will have them available as often as possible. Please share photos of your broth making days with us!

Animals · Chickens · Market · Meat · Production · Tutorial · Video

How to Break Down A Chicken, and Why We Don’t Do It For You

As we near the end of the warmer months, we are wrapping up our pastured meat bird production for the year. There is one batch of chickens left to head to the processor, a couple dozen turkeys, and some retiring laying hens. We frequently get asked if we will sell just chicken breasts, or just legs, or quartered or halved birds. The answer is almost always “No.” We have a few reasons for this, and I promise none of them are to be annoying!

The number one reason is that we just don’t raise enough birds to be able to get a substantial number done in any of those types of cuts. It’s also really difficult to predict how many of each type folks would want. The easiest option is to keep them all whole, and then our customers can break them down themselves.

Another reason we don’t get them broken down is that we don’t want to frustrate our processors! We bring in roughly 60 birds at a time, and to say we want five birds done this way, and 10 birds done like that, and 22 with this special treatment gets complicated and annoying for the people doing the work. We don’t have many options for processors in our area, so we do our best to keep them happy.

In addition to keeping things simple, we want to keep costs down. We have to pay an extra $1 or more per bird to get them quartered or cut into 8 pieces. We raise the prices on any birds we get cut up, which makes it more expensive for the customer. Getting the birds broken down also leaves some pieces behind. When they are turned into eight pieces, it leaves the “frame” which is essentially the cavity that you’d stuff if you were making a roasted bird. This has some weight to it, which the customer isn’t buying, so we lose money there. It costs us the same amount to raise a bird that will be left whole or cut up.

Finally, we want you to use the whole bird. These birds worked hard to gain weight and taste delicious. The best way to honor them is to use them to the fullest extent. A whole bird can make several meals for a family. Roast or grill it and eat what you want. Make sandwiches with the leftover meat. Put the rest of the yummy morsels of meat into soup. And finally make broth with what’s left of the carcass. If you don’t get the whole bird, you aren’t going to be able to make that many meals out of them!

Breaking down a whole chicken isn’t super complicated. Our friend Jamie from J. Waldron Butchers recently did a tutorial on how to part out a chicken. It’s very in-depth, and will help you turn your bird from us into any chicken cuts you need!

We hope this helps you understand more on why we do things the way we do. We appreciate each and every one of our customers, and we hope you enjoy the fruits of our labor. Thank you for supporting us this past year, and in previous years. It means the world to us

Animals · Chickens · Ducks · Product Review · Turkeys

Bugs for Birds! Black Soldier Fly Larvae for Backyard Chickens: A Review

We raise our animals as livestock, but we still enjoy spoiling them with tasty treats now and then. Recently, we were asked to review Bugs for Birds! and our flock was more than happy to oblige.

First thing’s first: Do you know how hard it is to photograph a bunch of birds? I swear this is 80% luck, 15% skills, and 5% avoiding all the beaks and bills. For every photo I share on the blog, Instagram, Facebook page, or elsewhere, I have probably taken an additional 15. I am picky when it comes to the photos I share. When I have fistfuls of treats, this makes it more difficult, because everyone wants to be all up in my business even more than usual. These snacks were no different. The birds seemed especially aggressive once they all got a taste for them.

First off, I started with the whole bag, hoping to get this awesome photo of the birds surrounding it. Something Instagrammable, you know? And then the turkeys did what turkeys seem to do best… acted dumber than I thought possible. “What’s this? Can I eat it?” to literally everything. And the cute logo didn’t stand a chance.

PECK PECK PECK! Please deliver snacks!

So I quickly gave up on that idea. Thought I should put them in a feed pan. Maybe I’d get something nice of a few of them pecking from outside the bowl… That was a big nope. They actually ended up flipping this onto themselves, and freaked out. I left the pan there for a minute while I put the bag down on the outside of the fence. By the time I got back, the two birds that were trapped under it had eaten every last crumb!

Fine, I will just throw them on the ground and let the birds go to town. Well, you can barely see them in the grass. And I didn’t want to waste these treats. They’re too precious! That concern was pretty much pointless as the birds scratched and pecked to find every last morsel of these weird little bug larvae.

Finally, I settled on dumping some out on the dirt. The turkeys went ballistic, and squeezed out most of the chickens. This was fine, because I could make a second pile for the rest of the birds. We wanted to make sure the layers got some, as these little snacks have a TON of calcium and protein to help produce delicious, healthy eggs. They also have added probiotics which help keep birds healthy. And clearly, the birds loved them, considering I was concerned I would lose some fingers at certain points.

Overall, we really liked these treats. They come in compostable packaging, ship quickly, are affordable, and the birds love them. If you have pet chickens, a flock of layers, or any other birds, these are a great way to spoil them and give them extra nutrition. You can learn more about Bugs for Birds on their Facebook page. If you order some, be sure to let us know what your birds think!

The four pound bag of Bugs for Birds! BSFL was provided to us in exchange for a review. This is our honest opinion of the product, and we were not compensated beyond the cost of the product. This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through that link, we make a small percentage of the sale which helps us keep a roof over our heads. Thank you for supporting a small farm.