Animals · Collaboration · Goats · Not Farming Related

Something Fun: Taco The Goat Stickers

Since acquiring our hodgepodge of goats, one of the little guys has amassed quite a fan club. Taco, a tiny little thing, has captivated so many people. He is small. Like really, really small. And I think that is part of his appeal!

We decided to work with our friend Nicole Lapointe, who we’ve had do some custom art for us in the past, to design something special to honor Taco and all his tiny, goaty goodness. She is awesomely talented, and perfectly captures the subjects in every piece she creates.

I know that if Taco’s little legs were just a wee bit longer, he would certainly be up on the roof any chance he got.

Her art was sent to StickerMule where we had stickers made. Their pricing is great, and the quality is top notch. So far, we have just this one design made, but we will have more stickers made in the future with other awesome animals! If you are interested in getting your own stickers, check out StickerMule!

Custom Stickers, Die Cut Stickers, Bumper Stickers - Sticker Mule
Alpaca · Animals · Chickens · garden · Goats · Llama · Sheep

The Day to Day of Winter Farming

This time of year, there isn’t a whole lot going on here, but that doesn’t mean we are sitting around all day. Our fifteen fuzzy hay eating animals still need hay and snacks brought out to them at least once a day, and the birds still need their feed and water taken care of.

We have shifted the way we do our chores slightly this winter. We were both getting home after dark some days, so we moved all of our poultry feeding to the mornings. One fifty pound sack of feed is divvied up between several feeders, and they seem to be fine with that. If one of us is home, we will go out a couple times with Luna and throw some “snackies” out for the birds. Snackies are scratch, kitchen scraps, or whatever else we might have for them. This keeps them entertained, and allows us to check on them periodically.

As for the fuzzy hay eating animals, we still occasionally feed them twice. They get at least one full bale of hay in the morning, which is sometimes brought out in a wheelbarrow. The smaller goats seem to enjoy when that happens. If they eat most of that, we give them another half bale of hay in the evening. We don’t like to give them all of it at once, because they just like to make a mess of it, and leave it all over the ground.

Taco is being very helpful in the wheelbarrow.

The nice part about them making a mess is that it’s great for them to bed down in. This works well for us, until the hay and poop piles up. We have been managing to stay on top of things, and we scoop out the spent hay pretty regularly.

This is a completely different day, and that is Milkshake in the wheelbarrow, and Betty eyeballing him, with Nugget on the left supervising.

The wheelbarrow loads of dirty hay get hauled around the pastures and are dumped into low spots in the ground. These holes are mostly caused by chickens taking excessively aggressive dust baths. I don’t know what their issue is, but they apparently think bathing for 45 minutes and tossing every speck of dirt three feet away is absolutely required. Filling the holes means we fall less frequently, which is always a good thing. We also toss some of the hay into the bird yard for them to scratch through. It soaks up some of the gross mud we have been dealing with for a while, and gives them a little more traction when the ground freezes. If we have any hay left after, it gets piled on top of our compost pile.

This is the bulk of what we have been doing all winter. Soon, we will begin ordering our seeds for the vegetable and flower gardens, as well as ordering chicks to raise. We are looking forward to working back into our daily routines.

Animals · Not Farming Related

Not Farming-Related: Nicole’s Thirtieth Birthday

This is going to be a little different than our usual content, but I hope you don’t mind. I promise there are cute animals!

My birthday is January 4th, and I turned 30 this year. Robert decided to make this birthday an extra fun one. We exchanged gifts for Solstice, and he had told me ahead of time that my gift was going to be an experience, instead of physical things, but he got me something to open and it was representative of what my gift was. I opened my gift, and immediately started crying. This is what greeted me.

This adorable sloth stuffed animal came from Amazon

I knew I would be petting sloths for my birthday! I couldn’t handle it. I couldn’t stop crying, and Luna had to help me calm back down. If you’ve seen that Kristen Bell sloth video, that was basically me, but she’s prettier.

So fast forward to my actual birthday. Bob let me sleep in, and went out to do animal chores. Unfortunately, one of our Jacob ewes, Tanka, knocked off one of her lateral horns and was bleeding pretty heavily. We got in touch with our sheep mentors, and they basically said “Well, it’s cold out. She will be fine.” So on we went with our day! And a week later, she’s still alright. We headed to Hillsdale to look at a potential farm truck. Spoiler: it was worse than a rust bucket. So it was a big fat NO. We ended up getting breakfast at Coffee Cup Diner which was AMAZING! Surprise Thai food for breakfast? Yes please! We both loved our meal, and we are planning on heading back there soon.

Post breakfast, we drove to Ann Arbor for my birthday present. The Creature Conservancy is an amazing non-profit educational organization. They started with surrendered pets that people realized they couldn’t take care of anymore. Who’d have though an alligator or an arctic fox would make bad pets? We met up with our guide Patricia, and we talked about what they do there.

Our first stop was the outdoor area where the black swans live. Being that Bob and I have experience with large waterfowl (our geese) we knew we didn’t need to get any closer than necessary. They are cool looking, but a whole lot of NOPE!

After that, we went indoors and through the kitchen area where they prep food for all the resident animals. They get a large portion of the fruit and vegetables donated by the Whole Foods that isn’t far from them. The animals are getting a large variety in their diets at basically no cost to The Creature Conservancy, WF doesn’t need to pay for waste disposal, and it’s keeping good food out of the landfill. Everyone wins! We may be donating some extra produce to them this summer, depending on how our gardens do, and if we cannot find something closer to us.

We walked through the indoor animal enclosures, which included some gigantic tortoises, a shy eagle, and an adorable kangaroo! We learned that kangaroos are super soft. Imagine a chinchilla, but… better? She was so chill. Petting her was awesome.

After the kangaroo, we watched the resident cougar with her new toy, a paper mache “deer”. The staff added some meat to the top of it so Quinn would be able to find it. She was really cool! Bob was really excited to find out that cougars can purr.

After seeing the cougar, we headed out to see the little goats. There are five little wethers, who were absolutely adorable. They all still have their horns, which was a little bothersome for me, because I am so used to ours who mostly don’t have horns, and these little guys were spoiled as babies, so they are exceptionally needy. Two of them chewed the ends off my shoelaces. However, I still love goats of all attitudes.

We really like their hay feeder, and we might look into getting a couple for our group. We would hang them, because I don’t think they’d be strong enough to hold up our pudgy beasts.

We wandered through a few more animal areas and ended up in front of Bed Head and Lady Gaga. This was the second most exciting animal encounter for me. Porcupines are an animal that makes me go mushy inside. I think they’re so silly and adorable looking, and I found out we would be feeding them sweet potatoes. We also learned they are basically garbage disposals and they love almost any produce that Whole Food donates!

Post porcupine perusal, we walked through the larger indoor area where the majority of the animals live. They had Macaws, which were loud, warthogs, who were kind of terrifying with their tusks, binturongs (that I didn’t get close enough to verify if they smell like popcorn), and many others. Finally, we went up some steps to where the most important animal encounter would occur.

The first sloth to come out was Poco. He was huge, much larger than I thought a sloth would be. I don’t know what I expected, but he moved faster than I thought possible! But we had grapes for him, so I totally understand his excitement He eagerly gobbled them off the straws Patricia shoved them on. Shortly after, his girlfriend Annie came moseying on out. She had a baby a few months ago, and it’s so stinking adorable, I almost cried.

Annie and baby sloth!

After the sloths, we headed back to the car and I promptly started crying. I was just so overwhelmed with all the amazing things I’d just seen, and couldn’t hold it in anymore. Bob was actually surprised that I didn’t cry while petting the sloth. And for those who are interested, sloths feel sort of like grey hair does.

Earl Grey was mine, and Aztec Chocolate was Bob’s

The rest of the evening included a visit to TeaHaus in Ann Arbor for macarons and tea. Which were both tasty. We also had No Thai for dinner, which was honestly the perfect way to end the evening! Nothing fancy, just something that would fill our bellies.

This was possibly the best birthday I’ve ever had, and I am so grateful we got to spend the day together. The weekend continued the festivities, and we went to Detroit and partied with many of our friends. Nothing will ever top this weekend!

Animals · Chickens · Ducks · Eggs · Goats · Meat · Production · Sheep

Winter is Coming to the Farm

Now that the rush of summer is gone, we were truly hoping that autumn and winter would be a little easier and calmer. So far, we have been wrong.

Our final batch of chickens for this season was brought to the processor last week. They are now in the freezer awaiting their new homes in the ovens and soup pots of our customers. This batch of chickens finished a little smaller than previous batches. We aren’t sure if it’s due to being later in the year, and the pasture not being quite as nutritious, or something else. That being said, they are just as delicious as the previous birds sent to the processor. We had to acquire an additional freezer to store these birds in. We are hoping to have it emptied out by the end of the year. Or at least have one of the meat freezers emptied out by then.

We have acquired several new animals recently. We have three Jacob sheep that we purchased from Sweetgrass Jacobs back at the end of October. One named Limerick, who is a two horned ram born in April of this year. We also got one two horned female and a four horned female, named Haiku and Tanka respectively. They are all quite skittish, but they are slowly warming up to us.

In addition to the sheep, we’ve acquired five goats. They came from a farm that was downsizing. We have three wethers and two does. The wethers are named Taco, Milkshake and Nugget, and the does are Curry and Fudge. Yes, we named them all after foods that goats can be made into. But we don’t plan on eating these ones any time soon.

Our chickens and ducks have slowed their egg production. We are still getting a dozen or two a day, but that’s a far cry from the overflowing baskets we were getting for most of the summer. It will pick back up in the spring. Everything has a season, and egg season is definitely early summer!

We will be processing our own turkey for Thanksgiving, and we are really looking forward to that. We have two really large males that we will choose between. The second one will be served up at the December holiday dinner. We hope the rest of the turkeys will lay eggs for us to hatch and raise up for next year’s holiday dinners.

All of our tasty products, and some of Nicole’s knitted items will be available at the Marshall Farmers Market at the B.E. Henry building. We hope to see you there! If you can’t make it, feel free to send us a message to make arrangements to get some eggs or chicken. Happy almost-winter!

Alpaca · Animals · Chickens · Llama · Product Review · Video

Watering Plants and Animals: A Review of Fogg-It Watering Nozzles

One of the frustrating things about starting seeds is that many of them need to be babied while they are sprouting. Watering with a regular hose nozzle is too strong of a stream and can disrupt the seeds, or break the fragile stems. We found these amazing misting nozzles on Amazon, and we knew they were a game changer.

foggitwatering

The Fogg-It Watering Nozzles come in a pack of three, or can be purchased individually. We decided to go for the three pack, as it would give us more options for different tasks. We are very glad we did! We use the 1/2 gallon per minute (GPM) nozzle to water our seed starts. The other two are used for watering the animals. A couple weeks ago, it got unseasonably hot for a couple days, and all of our animals were panting and struggling with the heat. We ran a couple hoses out to our chicken tractor, and ran the 1 GPM nozzle over them for almost an hour. They absolutely loved it! It was hilarious watching these meat birds drink the water running down the walls of the tractor. We also sprayed down Faith and Galahad, who seemed to really have fun with the water. They had just gotten their hair cuts a couple days prior which also helped keep them cool.

We also used the 2 GPM nozzle to mist the laying flock. We had it strung up in the tree to mist the shady areas, and the drips filled up a pool we set on the ground under the tree. This is an easy, relatively hands-off way of cooling the flock when it gets way too hot out. The hose can be left like that for a while and we can go and get other things done.

Overall, we are so happy we purchased these nozzles! They have several other sizes available, and they can also be purchased individually. If you get some of these for yourself, let us know what you think!

We purchased these nozzles at full price with our own money. We did not offer to do a review of this item, but we seriously love them so much we had to share them. The links in this post are affiliate links, which means that if you make a purchase through them, we get a small amount of money in return. Thank you for supporting our farm.

Animals · Chickens · Collaboration · Green Gardens Community Farm · Meat · Production

Raising Meat Birds

Something super exciting is happening at Frontière Farm House very soon! Our first batch of meat birds is going to the processor tomorrow, and we can’t wait to share them with all of you.

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The meat flock lining up for breakfast.

Back at the end of March, we received a shipment of Red Ranger and Husky Ranger chicks from The Chick Hatchery. They were so tiny when they first arrived! We struggled a little at first, and a few didn’t survive, but since that initial issue (which we’ve worked out for future batches) they haven’t had any health troubles. When we first got them, they grew so quickly. In fact, if one of us didn’t see them for a couple days, we noticed their growth very easily.

We are getting close to processing time, and we wanted to share more information about these soon-to-be delicious birds. As said previously, they are Red Ranger and Husky Ranger. These are both chicken breed crosses that have been selectively bred to grow fairly quickly. They are slightly slower growing and have far fewer health problems than the traditional Cornish cross, which was very important to us. In addition, the Ranger types are better for free range/pasture raising (hence the name). We have our birds in a mobile chicken coop, often called a chicken tractor, which we move to fresh grass every single day, and sometimes twice a day. They can eat all the grass, weeds, bugs and dirt they want. More than once we have seen them chase flying insects in the tractor and eagerly gobble them up. This is what chickens are meant to do! In addition, we feed them a high-quality meat bird grower feed which is blended at a local mill. It doesn’t contain any hormones or antibiotics and is made from grains grown local to us. Supporting local farmers is something that we do as often as possible!

Red Rangers and Husky Rangers mature in ten to twelve weeks. It is a short life, but our birds are very happy every single day they spend on our farm. We have a goal of making sure none of our animals have more than one bad day. We will be bringing them to a USDA inspected facility where they will be processed. We have heard nothing but good things about this processor, and we are confident that they will do a great job of minimizing suffering for our birds. Once they are killed, plucked, and cleaned, they will be wrapped, weighed, labeled, and we will bring them home in coolers. We will have them available fresh for the first day at the market, and then we will freeze them shortly after. We are taking pre-orders for the birds. For just $5, you secure your whole bird. That will go towards the total cost. They are $4.50 a pound for the whole birds, and if we end up doing halves or eight pieces, the price will be slightly more.

In addition to picking them up from us, we will have chicken available through our friends at Green Gardens Community Farm! The pricing will be the same, but pre-orders will not be available.

We already have our second batch of birds started, and these will also be ready in ten to twelve weeks. If you miss out on this first round, you don’t have too long to wait for more!

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Sixty birds for the next batch

Animals · Chickens · Ducks · Eggs · Geese · Goals · Meat · Production · Video

New Kids In The Flock: Recent Additions to Our Farm

We’ve been told that spring is coming, but we beg to differ. We’ve had alternating days of wonderful weather, with clear skies and reasonable temperatures, and complete garbage. This morning, I woke up to snow dusting the entire yard. Luna wasn’t super impressed with it when I took her out to do her business and care for the animals.

First thing every morning, we let the flock out of the coop. The chickens, ducks and muscovies spend the night in the coop, and the geese stay outside. They are too large, and just too mean to keep in with the rest of the flock overnight. Plus, we have them as “guard dogs” so we want them to make noise if something is amiss. This is what “Unleashing the Feather Beasts” looked like back in the fall.

In the last month or so, we’ve added several birds to our flock. The first were a pair of male muscovies. We got a white, as well as a lavender. Shortly after, we got a trio of females to go with them. We plan on breeding them to raise babies for both egg and meat production. We also acquired three female Toulouse geese, which seem to have bonded with the trio of American Buff geese we have. The plan for those is also raising babies for meat production. Plus, we’ll enjoy some eggs while we wait for the ladies to go broody.

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Our two handsome Muscovy boys

We have also ordered more layers, as well as our first batch of meat birds. The layers are going to be Easter Eggers, to add a little color to our cartons for the market. The meat birds are Red Rangers as well as Husky Rangers. The Easter Eggers will be added to our laying flock after brooding in the barn for a few weeks. The Rangers will be put into tractors to be moved around our pasture. We have several reasons we’ve chosen Rangers as opposed to the usual Cornish Cross meat birds, which we will go into more detail in a future post. Keep an eye out for that one!